Courses and Curriculum

Italian Course Descriptions: 2021/2022

**TENTATIVE COURSE OFFERINGS, SUBJECT TO CHANGE**


 

Italian Curriculum 2021-2022For more information about our courses, please download and read our 

PDF iconitalian_studies_guide_21-22.pdf

FALL COURSES 2020

  • ITAL 101 - Elementary Italian: That's Amore 

    Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo                                              

    Italians are known for savoring all pleasures and beauty that life can offer, from food to fashion, art to style, language to conviviality. In this hands-on course you will begin discovering Italy, its rich culture, and its people by becoming an active user of the Italian language, starting on the first day of class. You will learn how to learn a new language and to understand the modalities which make communication effective and culturally appropriate. As you hone your skills, you will be invited to reflect upon your personal learning goals, processes, and outcomes.

    Workload: This course is offered in two formats: (1) in presence 4 times per week + 1 hour online per week ; (2) in presence 3 times per week + 2 hours. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

    Texts: New Italian Espresso, by Italiaidea, Alma Edizioni, 2014 ($45).

  • ITAL 150 - Cultural Legacies of Italy

    Taught by Nathalie Hester

    This course explores the Italian peninsula and its wealth of cultural contributions, from Ancient Roman roads to Renaissance Art to Italian-American film. We will look at various art forms, such as painting, architecture, and opera. We will read from Dante’s Divine Comedy, discuss Machiavelli’s The Prince, consider the difficult legacy of Christopher Columbus in the US, and investigate Italian migration to the Americas and today’s Mediterranean migrations to Italy. We will hear lectures by a number of guest experts from our campus and beyond. As part of their coursework, students will conduct guided research on an Italian cultural legacy of their choosing, for example, regional foods, music, fashion and design, advertising, science, politics, or education.  This course fulfills the GP requirement and is conducted in English.

  • ITAL 201 - Intermediate Italian: The Bel Paese 

    Supervised by Claudia Ventura 

    Bel Paese or “beautiful country,” is the classical epithet for Italy because of its cultural heritage and natural endowment. In this course, you will explore a cornerstone of Italy’s beauty, the cities of art, with their magnificent piazzas, churches and palaces, traditional eateries and markets, and modern nightlife venues. By interpreting authentic multimedia material, participating in discussions, and writing various texts, you will improve your ability to narrate, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in Italian. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop an Italian Portfolio where you showcase your greatest strengths and accomplishments. See one student's sample.

    Workload: This course meets in presence 3 times per week + 1 hour online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

    Text: The Bel Paese, by Claudia Ventura, PDFs in Canvas.   

  • ITAL 303 - Advanced Italian: Society, Economy and Politics

    Taught by Kevin Regan-Maglione 

    The course is a multidisciplinary approach to contemporary Italian life and culture since postwar Italy. For this reason, the course begins with a historical overview:  the economic miracle and the beginning of political activism; corruption within the Italian political system during the ‘80s and ‘90; the judiciary cleansing called “Tangentopoli” that marked the passage from “Prima Repubblica” to “Seconda Repubblica” (1992-1994); Berlusconi’s era (1994-2013) and the European Union; rise of the new political party “Movimento 5 stelle”; COVID-19 and current societal and political topics. The subtitle of this course’s itineration is, “L’Italia in declino?” (Is Italy in a decline?) because we will consider Italy’s self-directed pessimism in conjunction with their fierce protection from outside critique. This is the course’s point of entry to society, politics, and economics as we will study how and why this dichotomy exists in Italian culture.

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    WINTER COURSES 2022

    • ITAL 102 - Elementary Italian: Italian Holidays and Traditions

      Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo                                             

      Italians take their centuries-old traditions very seriously, celebrating them with gusto and pride. You will discover some of Italy’s most colorful and iconic festivities such as the Befana in Rome and Urbania, the Carnival of Venice and Siena’s spirited Palio, while increasing your proficiency in Italian. As you hone your skills, you will be invited to reflect upon your personal learning goals, processes, and outcomes. While advancing in your ability to effectively communicate in Italian, you will develop a collaborative presentation on a traditional festival of your choice.

      Workload: This course is offered in two formats: in presence 4 times per week + 1 hour online per week. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

      Texts: New Italian Espresso, by Italiaidea, Alma Edizioni, 2014 (the same textbook acquired for ITAL 101)

    • ITAL 152 - Italian Cinema: Desire and Resistance

      Taught by Sergio Rigoletto

      How can cinema visualise forms of resistance against oppression and tyranny? How can films enable us to imagine alternative futures? In this course, you will explore Italian cinema history in relation to national and global struggles for social justice and equality. You will also discover how Italian filmmakers fought to defend their cultural heritage against the imperialistic aspirations of Hollywood Studios. Through class discussions and presentations, the course will enable students to justify the claim made by many film scholars for whom Italian cinema was the most influential national cinema of the 20th century. This course fulfills the GP requirement and it is conducted in English.  

    • ITAL 202 - Intermediate Italian: Italian Excellence

      Supervised by Claudia Ventura                                              

      Italian culture is steeped in the arts, fashion, music, and food. Home of major centers of the Renaissance art and craftsmanship on the Italian peninsula have flourished for centuries. In this course, you will analyse contemporary Made in Italy production in fashion, furniture design, high tech, and music. We also will discover the Italians behind the ‘Made in Italy’ brand as well as genius minds such as Galileo and Leonardo. By interpreting multimedia material, participating in discussions and writing various texts, you will improve your ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in Italian. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop an Italian Portfolio where you showcase your greatest strengths and accomplishments. See one student's sample.

      Workload: This course meets in presence 3 times per week +1 hour online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

      Texts: Italian Excellence, by Claudia Ventura, PDFs in Canvas.

    • ITAL 305 - Advanced Italian: Italian Culinary Culture

      Taught by Diana Garvin

      From Dante's infernal Circle of the Gluttons to Caravaggio's delectable fruit baskets to Artusi's patriotic nationalist cookbook, Italian history is written in garlic and oil, basil and tomatoes, torte and tortellini.  This course, taught in Italian, focuses on food in literature, opera, and art to teach Italian history. Weekly workshops will examine opera, theater, and painting in a historical context. Close readings of cookbooks and recipes will show how playwrights and painters prepared their daily minestra.  We will contextualize the workshops and close readings with a series of short lectures devoted to Italian culinary history.  By studying masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present day through the lively and accessible theme of food, you will conclude this course with a knowledge of modern Italian history and culture that is as memorable as it is delicious. 

      • ITAL 407/507 - Mediterranean Ecocriticism 

        Taught by Diana Garvin

        Ecocriticism is a body of theory exploring human-land relationships. Our course centers on Mediterranean ecocriticism to highlight environmental debates that are specific to Northern Italy and France. Theorists like Serenella Iovino, Bruno Latour, and Michel Serres will guide our analysis of Slow Food activism, COP-21 performance art, and wine-making during climate change. Because this course aims to prepare you for leadership in the field, our projects teach professionalization.You will learn the Five Stages of Grant Writing through modules with visiting experts. Public speaking labs provide practice to give a compelling talk. By the end of this course, you will have a fellowship application and a conference paper ready for submission, helping you to launch your professional trajectory into the wider world. 

        This course is taught in English. Romance Languages students will read the primary texts and complete written work in their target language to receive credit in French or Italian. M.A. Periods: French 1, 2; Italian 1, 2.

      • SPRING COURSES 2022

        • ITAL 103 - Elementary Italian: Italian History and Stories

          Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo                                              

          Italian recent history is riddled with fascinating and confounding events. In this course, you will discover some historically significant moments in 20th century Italy. As you hone your skills, you will be invited to reflect upon your personal learning goals, processes, and outcomes. While advancing in your ability to effectively communicate in Italian, you will develop a collaborative presentation on a historical event of your choice.

          Workload: This course is offered in two formats: in presence 4 times per week + 1 hour online per week. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

          Texts: New Italian Espresso, by Italiaidea, Alma Edizioni, 2014 (the same textbook acquired for ITAL 101-102).

        • ITAL 317 - Medieval and Renaissance Literature

          Taught by Nathalie Hester

          Italian Medieval and Renaissance literature's legacy is vibrant and ever-present in society. T his formative time period focuses on the human condition, something that ripples through to today with which we may identify. In this course, you will not only improve your breadth of Italian and its literature, you will also learn to identify key symbols and ideas that are ubiquitous centuries later. Together we will read renown writers, like the three Florentine crowns, while developing analytical skills to better understand their innovative methods in this time period. You will also explore how it is that these texts examine the definition of humanity, and by extension, how humans still grapple with human terms. This course considers how Italian Medieval and Renaissance literature is relevant today through their exploration of humanity and the written form. Together we will read famous writers while developing critical literary skills to better understand their strategies and therefore grasp their endless significance.

        • ITAL 152 - Feminist Lens

          Taught by Diana Garvin

          “Feminist Lens” focuses on films produced by Italian and French female directors, introducing you to the brilliant women behind the cameras from the 1970s to today. Activities emphasize the real-world stakes of cinema: we will analyze European receptions of Hollywood’s #metoo movement, then co-design the trigger-warning system for use in our class. Questions of gender roles and violence from Fascism and Nazism inflect Lina Wertmüller’s Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975) and Liliana Cavani’s German trilogy (1974-1985). Intersections of sexuality tangle former Maghreb colonies and multi-ethnic metropoles in Claire Denis’s Beau Travail (1999) and White Material (2010).  Ultimately, assignments provide a toolkit for analyzing cinema (angles, frames, and shots) as well as the history of Southern European feminism, from second-wave feminist groups like Rivolta Femminile to third-wave alliances like Féministes indigènes. This course fulfills the GP requirement and is conducted in English.  

        • ITAL 203 - Intermediate Italian: One Italy, Many Italies

          Supervised by Claudia Ventura 

          Globalization and immigration seem to carry new challenges for Italy’s socio-economic stability.  By examining infographics and data as well as personal stories and participating in discussions, you will explore current social phenomena such as young adults' unemployment, LGBTQ rights, and immigrant routes in Italy to gain a critical panorama of Italian society. You will also advance further your ability to narrate, compare and contrast, and express opinions in Italian. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop a collaborative e-poster presentation about a topic of your interest in Italian society. 

          Workload: This course meets in presence 3 times per week + 1 hour online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

          Text: One Italy, Many Italies, by Claudia Ventura, University of Oregon Printing, 2020 ($15-17)    

        • ITAL 319 - Eco-Italy 

          Taught by Diana Garvin

          This interdisciplinary course bridges the arts and the sciences, introducing you to human-land relationships across Southern Italy and North Africa. Together, we will explore the Green Humanities in the greater Mediterranean: we will analyze activist artwork inspired by earthquakes and volcanoes.  We will read investigative reporting on the eco-mafia and discuss the meaning of their slogan, “Trash is Gold.” Materials emphasize long-form journalism and documentary film, because these forms of writing and filmmaking craft compelling stories to support sustainability across government and industry. So too do assignments: you will create an online portfolio exploring environmental themes, including a weekly photojournal, a mini-podcast series, and a Youtube video. By the end of this course, you will be able to speak about ecological phenomena in vivid, human terms. Conducted in English with credits for the Italian minor and major.

        • RL 407/507 - Early Modern Travel Writing 

          Taught by Nathalie Hester

          For centuries travel and travel writing have been parallel endeavors. In the early modern period, prescriptions concerning the art of travel also addressed how to properly chronicle a journey. However, as curiosity became an acceptable motive for travel, European travelers took greater individual liberties not only in choosing an itinerary but also in narrating their travels. In this course we will read from English, French, Italian, and Spanish travel accounts in order to consider a broad range of issues and questions, including: taxonomies of travel writing, travel narrative as theoretical discourse, the construction of local and global identities through the representation of travel, and the links between travel writing and European expansion and conquest. Readings will include the travel writing of humanists, navigators, pilgrims, merchants, ambassadresses, Grand Tourists, adventurers, and fugitives.

          This course is taught in English. Romance Languages students will read the primary texts and complete written work in their target language to receive credit in French, Italian, or Spanish. M.A. Periods: Spanish 1, 2; French 1, 2; Italian 1,2,3.